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anijutsu:

pixiv: コーラ
Danbooru: Cola (gotouryouta)

anijutsu:

(via lcom)

grimelords:

this is my new speed dating technique: be upfront about your passions and capabilities

grimelords:

this is my new speed dating technique: be upfront about your passions and capabilities

(via 3liza)

₩ITCH ₩ORKS

boysinbarrettes said: what's the deal with artist's statements on art projects? are they required by institutions or something? it's always a little jarring seeing a really cool painting or photo project or whatever, next to a really academic, nearly impenetrable wall of text about it

3liza:

teratocybernetics:

3liza:

3liza:

Artists universally despise artist’s statements, in my experience, and only do it under intense duress. We hate writing them and we hate people reading them. They are generally demanded by business managers, gallerists, collectors, schools, occasionally patrons (although not often, hail satan), press kits, CVs, and group shows or festivals.

Last time I was asked for an artist’s statement (for a press kit) I made Simon write it for me after listing off some shit I’ve done, and only gave it a very cursory glance before “approving” it. 

My best guess is that you can safely ignore artist’s statements, and/or assume someone had to write it at gunpoint, or that it was written by a third party and the artist wanted as little to do with it as possible.

"my music isn’t constrained by petty labels like ‘genre’, man, so like, dont put me in a box"

Artists statements: because people who buy big-a Art as an institution don’t think ‘I had a cool idea’, ‘I wanted to use this colour’ or ‘I was drunk’ are enough of a story for a piece because they couldn’t make it themselves.

see also: why every prehistoric artifact without an obvious utilitarian purpose is deemed a “ritual object”, and not “i whittled this because i had a lot of free time in the neolithic”

(Source: franki-e, via spooky-dingus)

immortaltrash:

when you remember something embarrassing you did 6 years ago

image

(via kotaline)

giancarlovolpe:

isaia:

glassshard:

8bitmaximo:

leseanthomas:

OMFG. THIS. SHOW.

GPOY FOREVER.

This dude’s face is amazing. He’s like a Japanese Jim Carrey.

Friendly reminder that the main actor here, Yuya Yagira grew up from being that kid that starred in the sad Japanese independent live action film: “Nobody Knows” 

Hold up- where can I watch this show??

(via kotaline)

rincewitch:

rincewitch:

achewood is obviously really good and as a body of work is a stunning achievement in webcomics
but i always think of this cat and girl page when i try to appraise it
very well-done, but

there’s achewood chat on my dash so it’s time to reblog this cat and girl page for the nth time

rincewitch:

rincewitch:

achewood is obviously really good and as a body of work is a stunning achievement in webcomics

but i always think of this cat and girl page when i try to appraise it

very well-done, but

there’s achewood chat on my dash so it’s time to reblog this cat and girl page for the nth time

(via 3liza)

(Source: twitter.com, via 3liza)

(Source: stresscomic, via beartzu)

huffingtonpost:

Jon Stewart’s Priceless Response To Fox News On Ferguson

Jon Stewart is back from vacation, and he’s not wasting any time going after one of his favorite targets: Fox News.

Watch his the full brilliant 10  minute monologue on racism and Ferguson  here. 

(via kotaline)

afp-photo:

CITE DU VATICAN, Vatican City : Pope Francis matle blown by the wind covers his face as he leads the weekly general audience at St Peter’s square on August 27, 2014 in Vatican City. AFP PHOTO / VINCENZO PINTO

afp-photo:

CITE DU VATICAN, Vatican City : Pope Francis matle blown by the wind covers his face as he leads the weekly general audience at St Peter’s square on August 27, 2014 in Vatican City. AFP PHOTO / VINCENZO PINTO

(via kotaline)

shavostars:

I think about pokemon in non-battle situations a lot. Like pokemon who have been trained/raised to be helpers and assistants than to be battle partners.

Pokemon visiting hospitals to cheer patients up like dogs and cats do. Or ones that help kids learn to read, speak, swim, go through therapy?! Even pokemon who’s abilities help owners with specific disabilities?!

I love thinking of pokemon outside of battle situations.

(via lcom)

walkingintochaos:

thisshitfunny:

thatdudeemu:

queerasfuck88:

Jon Stewart Goes After Fox in Powerful Ferguson Monologue

I been waiting for the daily show to come back so they could cover this

Jon rip them boys a new asshole 

See, Jon Stewart usually does a lot of satirical humour, but at this point, the writers are just like “fuck the comedy this shit is real” and I was so happy to see that they finally covered this, and it was really well done.

(Source: youtube.com, via kotaline)

laylainalaska:

fuckyeahsources:

Nope. But the real story is better. Bolding mine:

The late Ruth Thompson, a cell painter on “Snow White” who later became a multiplane scene planner, recalled: “We tried everything - airbrush, drybrush, even lipstick and rouge, which is perhaps the basis for the legend because we did, in fact, try it. But nothing worked.

The airbrush was difficult to control on such a small area; drybrush was too harsh; lipstick and rouge unwieldy and messy. Everything proved to be impractical and all hope seemed lost to give Snow White her little bit of color when the idea of using a dye was proposed.

Again Ms. Thompson: “Someone suggested a red dye because the blue day we added to give Donald Duck his distinctive sailor-blue never really could be washed off the cell without leaving a bluish stain where the paint had been applied.”

Ever since the mid 30’s when color became the norm for all the cartoons, not just the “Silly Symphonies,” all paints and inks were made at the studio. During this period as well cells were routinely reused for economic reasons, thus the need to wash them off. Apparently Donald’s special blue color was made with a dye added to the usual powdered pigments. “So we tried that.” As the women gathered around in what must have seemed just another dead-end effort, all eyes became fixed on the red dot which soon became a small glow with no perceptible edge. The hushed silence soon gave way to sighs of relief. The method had finally been found. Now the application.

Among the studio’s many inkers (an extremely demanding profession), was one young lady whose training and skill was unique: Helen Ogger. Just being an inker placed one within the elite confines of this most “holy of holies” area of the Nunnery, as the Ink and Paint Department was so called (Walt had strict and quite Victorian views that the sexes not mingle at the workplace, allowing no male personnel save the “gofer” boy and the paymaster “Mr.” Keener to enter this domain of mostly unmarried women ). But Helen was in addition a very fine cartoonist and one of the few women at Disney’s or anywhere else, who could animate.

Such a seemingly insignificant detail (as the cheek colors) might be thought not worthy of special mention (she, as well as the other inkers and painters, was given no screen credit). But when one adds up the number of footage required to be tinted freehand on each individual cell, the hours suddenly turn into weeks and months. In fact, such a treatment was never attempted again on such a scale and even today, the publicity stills from “Snow White,” most of which do not have the added blush, bear witness to how that little touch of extra care adds to the vitality we see on the screen.

The work was done on all close-ups, most medium shots, and even on some long shots. The Queen was also similarly tinted. Hundreds of hours were needed to complete this task, arduous, repetitive and, of course, hard on the eyes. Ultimately a handful of other girls were needed to assist Helen as the clocked ticked toward the deadline.

Helen had to place several cells together on an animation board, one atop the other, just like in the process of animation, in order to get the ‘registration’ right (the spot of red just right in relation to the preceding and following ones) - all of this without any guide. She would work out her own extremes and then ‘animate’ the blush in inbetweens. Her work deserves admiration and gratitude and it is unfortunate that her contribution has remained unknown and her anonymity unaltered during her lifetime. She was paid, as were the rest of the Inkers, $18 a week, which included a half-day on Saturday and the many, many hours of unpaid overtime “Snow White” would require - all given unstintingly, (by everyone involved, it should be added), to a project whose joy in participating was its own reward.

She eventually became head of Inking and Special Effects and even taught classes in animation at the studio. She left in 1941 (apparently part of the terrible strike that would leave the Disney Studio changed forever), taking her skills with her. She died in Glendale in February of 1980. Perhaps it is safe to say that her departure was critical to the abrupt demise of this now unique effect (it was also used, though on a much smaller scale in both “Pinocchio” and “Fantasia”). None of the other inkers or painters were animators and it is this fact, not just the factor of economy nor the changing tastes, which surely must be considered a reason why such details were never attempted again. The golden age was over.

Also, here’s an interesting article about female cel painters at Disney. I am now fascinated by the idea of writing something with a Depression-era cel painter as a protagonist.

(Source: timblanks, via kotaline)

kogath:

Capcom Figure Builder Palicoes Volume 3

Lagiacrus Cat, Zamtrios Cat, Arzuros Cat, Seltas Cat, Tetsucabra Cat, and Alloy Cat.

(Source: monsterhunter.wikia.com, via lcom)